Mark Bittman: What’s wrong with what we eat

In this fiery and funny talk, New York Times food writer Mark Bittman weighs in on what’s wrong with the way we eat now (too much meat, too few plants; too much fast food, too little home cooking), and why it’s putting the entire planet at risk.

Annunci

Mindful Meats

Mindful Meats is a meat brand that is focusing on a transparent production following more ethical parameters. This values come expressed in their new brand strategy and designs by Pearlfisher. Even if you don’t eat meat, it’s interesting to get to know how brands are embodying these contemporary ideas about Food & Sustainability and expressing it to our society. Take a look.

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Pearlfisher has created the brand strategy, brand identity, packaging design, tone of voice and website template for a new challenger meat brand – Mindful Meats. Mindful Meats’ mission is to create systemic change and impact on the way Americans eat meat by increasing peoples’ access and connection to organically, sustainably raised meat through a fair and transparent system.

Pearlfisher’s brief was to create a challenger meat brand that immediately signals a systemic change. And as Hamish Campbell, Creative Director at Pearlfisher, responds,
“We understand that change is hard and so we are seeking to challenge existing consumer habits through an arresting visual and verbal language and by introducing a new level of intimacy and connection to the product itself – the cows.”
Talking about the identity and design, Design Director, Matt Sia continues,

“We wanted to build the brand through the symbol of the cow. Nothing is simpler than the name. It is a short, sharp and direct expression of the business and we have combined the name with  the visual in the form of a bold, proud stamp and stencil. This can then be used and translated across all forms of brand communication from product to retail environment.”

Claire Herminjard, Founder of Mindful Meats added,

“Pearlfisher’s design for Mindful Meats has helped bring our brand mission to life, signifying the quality of our product but also celebrating the animal, the farmer, and the land who bring it to us. Our belief in omnivory and the mindful consumption of meat has been flawlessly executed on pack by the Pearlfisher team.”

Designed by Pearlfisher

Credits

Creative Director: Hamish Campbell, Pearlfisher

Creative Partner: Jonathan Ford, Pearlfisher

Strategy Director: Tess Wicksteed, Pearlfisher

Senior Designer: Kate Caravaty, Pearlfisher”

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Via The Dieline

“I am stronger than bacon.”

good challenge vegetarianism

Things are easier said than done, or so the old adage goes, and we couldn’t agree more. That’s why we do The GOOD 30-Day Challenge, a monthly attempt to live better.

It’s fast becoming a well-known fact that eating less meat is good for the earth. Dr. Rajendra Pachauri, chair of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, has said that “in terms of immediacy of action and the feasibility of bringing about reductions in a short period of time, [people eating less meat] clearly is the most attractive” way to fight climate change. Authors from Upton Sinclair to Jonathan Safran Foer have detailed the horrific animal cruelty and human-rights abuses associated with factory farming and meat processing. And most doctors will tell you that eating fewer animal products is simply better for your health. As beloved food writer Michael Pollan has summed it up, “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

With all of this in mind, our GOOD 30-Day Challenge for June is to go vegetarian. Though we failed last month’s driving challenge, a majority of GOOD staffers have committed to cutting down their meat consumption or giving up meat entirely for the next four weeks. Some people who were already vegetarians (myself included) will try to go vegan. The hope is that eating less meat will prompt us to think more critically about our dietary choices.

Consider this post an open invitation to join in the challenge. On Twitter and Facebook, we’ll be using the hashtag #30DaysofGOOD to keep you abreast of our progress, and we hope you’ll use it to let us know how you’re faring as well.

Now repeat after me: “I am stronger than bacon.”

Photo (cc) by Flickr user little blue hen

Via | GOOD Magazine

Transparency: Which Countries Eat the Most Meat

A GOOD Transparency

An increase in the consumption of meat is directly correlated to an increase in a country’s economic development. As a country becomes richer, its citizens generally eat more meat, a much denser source of protein than is available in poorer countries. But the range of the amount of meat eaten in different countries around the world is truly astounding, from barely enough for a few hamburgers to the weight of several people. Our latest Transparency is a look at which countries are eating the most meat every year, on a per capita basis, and which are eating the least.

UPDATE: We’ve changed some of the colors on this piece to make it more readable. You can see the original version here.

For a full list of countries by meat consumption, going back to 1961, click here (Via the Guardian Data Blog).

A collaboration between GOOD and Zut Alors, Inc.