Beck’s Edison Bottle, World’s 1st Playable Beer Bottle

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“19th Century technology meets 21st Century music over a bottle of beer in the latest extension to the Beck’s Record Label project. This time, the art label has evolved, and been replaced by the grooves of Auckland band Ghost Wave. Their new single was inscribed into the surface of a Beck’s beer bottle which could then be played on a specially-built device based on Thomas Edison’s original phonograph.” See the Video and HEAR the bottle after the jump!

“Making the world’s first playable beer bottle was a formidable technical challenge. The clever people at Auckland firm Gyro Constructivists first had to design and build a record-cutting lathe, driven by a hard drive recording head. Then they reinvented Edison’s original cylinder player, using modern materials and electronics and built to very fine tolerances. The Edison Bottle made its public debut at SemiPermanent in Auckland in May to a standing ovation from the assembled media and design community.

Beck’s has had a long association with music and art. In fact, at about the same time Heinrich Beck was brewing his first beer in the 1870s, Tom Edison was tinkering away on designs for the first phonograph. Considering how beer has influenced recorded music since then, this physical collaboration was very appropriate and long overdue.”

Client: Beck’s New Zealand
Creative Agency: Shine Limited 
Machine & Bottle Production: Gyro
Making-of Video Production: VICE
Record Label: Arch Hill Recordings
Band: Ghost Wave
Album: Ages
Featured Single: Here She Comes

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Via The Dieline

Annunci

Fa Bene – food surplus sharing

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fa bene is a food surplus sharing project brought by the non profit cultural association PLUG. It happened on May 20th in Turin (piazza Cerignola).

The initiative aims to redistribute Cerignola’s market food surplus sharing it with families that need it. The goal is to turn environmental and economic costs into social benefits. The food surplus is going to be delivered to those needing families during three months. fa bene is part of the Smart City Days events as an attempt to reduce food waste.

Here are some photos from the event.

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Buycott

Buycott is an an app to find out what companies and causes your money supports when you are looking for a product. Using the app, is possible to get information about the product’s traceability and make their root informations available to more people by sharing it.

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Have you ever wondered whether the money you spend ends up funding causes you oppose?

A buycott is the opposite of a boycott. Buycott helps you to organize your everyday consumer spending so that it reflects your principles.

Example: During the SOPA/PIPA debate in 2012, a number of companies pushed to pass legislation that reduced online freedom of expression, while other companies fought hard to oppose the legislation. With Buycott, a campaign can be quickly created around a cause, with the goal of targeting companies with a boycott unless they change their position, or buycotting a company to show your support.

When you use Buycott to scan a product, it will look up the product, determine what brand it belongs to, and figure out what company owns that brand (and who owns that company, ad infinitum). It will then cross-check the product owners against the companies and brands included in the campaigns you’ve joined, in order to tell you if the scanned product conflicts with one of your campaign commitments.

Get the app here.

Mindful Meats

Mindful Meats is a meat brand that is focusing on a transparent production following more ethical parameters. This values come expressed in their new brand strategy and designs by Pearlfisher. Even if you don’t eat meat, it’s interesting to get to know how brands are embodying these contemporary ideas about Food & Sustainability and expressing it to our society. Take a look.

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Pearlfisher has created the brand strategy, brand identity, packaging design, tone of voice and website template for a new challenger meat brand – Mindful Meats. Mindful Meats’ mission is to create systemic change and impact on the way Americans eat meat by increasing peoples’ access and connection to organically, sustainably raised meat through a fair and transparent system.

Pearlfisher’s brief was to create a challenger meat brand that immediately signals a systemic change. And as Hamish Campbell, Creative Director at Pearlfisher, responds,
“We understand that change is hard and so we are seeking to challenge existing consumer habits through an arresting visual and verbal language and by introducing a new level of intimacy and connection to the product itself – the cows.”
Talking about the identity and design, Design Director, Matt Sia continues,

“We wanted to build the brand through the symbol of the cow. Nothing is simpler than the name. It is a short, sharp and direct expression of the business and we have combined the name with  the visual in the form of a bold, proud stamp and stencil. This can then be used and translated across all forms of brand communication from product to retail environment.”

Claire Herminjard, Founder of Mindful Meats added,

“Pearlfisher’s design for Mindful Meats has helped bring our brand mission to life, signifying the quality of our product but also celebrating the animal, the farmer, and the land who bring it to us. Our belief in omnivory and the mindful consumption of meat has been flawlessly executed on pack by the Pearlfisher team.”

Designed by Pearlfisher

Credits

Creative Director: Hamish Campbell, Pearlfisher

Creative Partner: Jonathan Ford, Pearlfisher

Strategy Director: Tess Wicksteed, Pearlfisher

Senior Designer: Kate Caravaty, Pearlfisher”

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Via The Dieline

Black Cow – World’s First Pure Milk Vodka

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WHAT IS BLACK COW?

Black Cow is the world’s first pure milk vodka, made entirely from the milk of grass grazed cows and nothing else. Fresh whole milk makes an exceptionally smooth vodka with a unique creamy character.
WHERE DOES THE IDEA COME FROM?

Pure Milk Vodka is the invention of West Dorset dairy farmer Jason Barber. His inspiration came from a desire to diversify the produce from his 250 strong dairy herd and his deep personal interest in vodka.

HOW IS IT MADE?

The milk is separated into curds and whey. The curds are used to make cheese, the whey is fermented into a beer using a special yeast that converts the milk sugar into alcohol. This milk beer is then distilled and treated to our secret blending process. The vodka is then triple filtered and finished, before being hand bottled.

Incidentally Black Cow is made from the same milk that is used to make Barber’s 1833 cheddar, winner of the World Cheese Awards Cheddar Trophy 2012

Santa Cruz

 

 

Check out this surprising Anagrama‘s work for Santa Cruz. A great coherent branding project featuring human concern regarding food and its cultural integrity and natural value.

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“Santa Cruz is a quick service Mexican BBQ restaurant located in Santa Catarina, a municipality of the greater Monterrey area in northeast Mexico. Santa Cruz’s menu contains food such as brisket and baby-back ribs slow-cooked to tender perfection and offered in an array of different ready-to-go, conventional styles such as burgers and tacos. While working on this project we had the incredible opportunity to work alongside our friend and architect Eiji Hayakawa, who was in charge of the building’s extraordinary construction and design.

The hand-made quality of the logotype and overall identity is meant to praise the careful, traditional and apprehensive food making process of Santa Cruz.

The brand is simple and direct, and above all, always honest and sincere, never attempting to hide its conceptual rugged awkwardness. Destined to be franchised in the future, Santa Cruz’s honest and handcrafted demeanor will inevitably be distinctive amid all other, more synthetic fast food chain restaurants.

The project was done in collaboration with architect Eiji Hayakawa. While we developed the brand values and visual identity, Eiji worked on the restaurant’s unique and unusual architecture. The massive, scarlet barn-like structure is distinctively prominent amid the industrially gray and blue mountainous backdrop of its physical setting.”

 

Designed by Anagrama

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Ideo/Samuel Adam’s Beer Can & Budweiser Bowtie-Shaped Can

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Samuel Adams engaged Ideo to undertake research and development into a new can, which was honed with the help of sensory expert Roy Desrochers from GEI consultants.

One of the findings was that much of what is perceived to be taste is actually smell, so the opening has been moved slightly further away from the edge of the lid and nearer to the drinker’s nose to help accentuate hop aromas.

A flared lip and wider top have been introduced in an attempt to emulate drinking from a glass, delivering ‘a more pronounced, more balanced flavour experience’ according to Desrochers, who says the extended lip makes the drinking experience ‘smoother and more comfortable.’

An hourglass ridge creates turbulence ‘to push out the flavour of the beer’ according to Samual Adams, which says that all of the modifications to a standard can design work in concert to improve airflow and aroma.

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Prototype on the right

The can was tested to assess how it impacts flavour, and how its ergonomic form controls flow and the way beer hits taste receptors on the drinker’s tongue.

Samuel Adams is saying the difference between the new can and a standard one ‘will be modest’ but drinkers should notice the difference.

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When the format launches in the US this summer it will be the first time Samuel Adams has been available in a can.

Founder and brewer Jim Koch says, ‘I wasn’t convinced that Boston Lager would taste as good as it does from a bottle.’

In other beer-can news, Budweiser is set to launch a bowtie-shaped can, which is structured to mirror the brand’s logo.

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The can will launch in the US next month, but will not be available in other countries.

Pat McGauley, vice president of innovation for Anheuser-Busch, Budweiser’s parent company, says, ‘This can is incomparable, like nothing you’ve ever seen before.’

He adds, ‘We explored various shapes that would be distinguishable in the marketplace, but also viable from an engineering standpoint. Aluminium can be stretched only about 10 per cent without fracturing, which requires that the angles of the bowtie be very precise’.

According to Budweiser, the development of the can by Anheuser-Busch engineers required ‘major equipment investments’ at Budweiser’s can-making facility in Newburgh, New York.

It adds, ‘Significant capital investments also were required to upgrade packaging lines at the Budweiser breweries in Los Angeles and Williamsburg, Virginia, the first breweries with capability to package this unique can innovation’.

The can, which has been in development since 2010, will only be available in eight-packs, and will not replace the traditional Budweiser can.

The slimmer design means the new cans hold 11.3 ounces of beer compared to the traditional can’s 12 ounces.

The brand says there is ‘no written documentation on the origins of the Budweiser bowtie’, but that the double-triangle bowtie logo was introduces to emphasise the full Budweiser name ‘when too many people were using the “Bud” bar call too frequently’.

The brand says the bowtie symbol was first used in a Budweiser national advertising campaign in 1956.

The launch of the can on 6 May is being supported with a marketing campaign that includes digital, print and television. It will be available in US grocery stores, supermarkets, convenience stores and liquor stores, according to the brand.

Via Design Week