Slow Food Story

Slow Food Story is a documentary about how Carlo Petrini and his friends created the Slow Food movement. A revolutionary quest made of strong beliefs regarding economy, politics, science, philosophy… A story regarding people’s wellbeing bringing the spotlight on Food and it’s key role in contemporary world problems. You can find more information about it on Slow Food Story’s website (italian). The movie premieres in Italy on May 30.

 

 

Since I did not find any english descriptions or subtitles for the movie trailer, I am posting the translation I made from the italian release. It is not good english, but I guess the message is clear.

Here it is:

The story of the man and the movement that revolutionized gastronomy

This is the story of a revolution.

A cultural revolution, one of those that do not leave dead on the field, but still, when set in motion, marks a point of no return.

This is the story of a slow revolution. Slow. As a snail.

A revolution has been going on for 25 years and still shows no signs of stopping.

It has a Commander in Chief, which is called Carlo Petrini, called Carlìn.

The inventor of Slow Food.

In Italy, 1986, he founded the gastronomic association Arcigola, and three years later in Paris launches Slow Food. An international movement that began as a resistance to Fast Food, that came threatening the local cuisine all over the planet.

People like the idea, the movement of the nut made followers grow worldwide. Starting from Bra, a town of 27 thousand inhabitants, and speaking almost exclusively Piedmontese dialect, Carlìn creates out of nothing an international association that now has 85,000 members in 130 countries, and has a tremendous impact in the world of gastronomy and culture of our time.

His bet is powerful. It is to free food from the cultural marginality that it is relegated and get the focus on the centrality of food – regarding economy, politics, science, philosophy.

The ambition is revealed in all its greatness in the 2000s, when Petrini gives life to his most visionary projects: Terra Madre, a forum of 5000 farmers from around the world gathered in Turin to give voice to agriculture that fights against damaging mass crops, also giving life to the University of Gastronomic Sciences, which brings dignity to the academic study of food.

Meanwhile, gastronomy – also thanks to him – flies: the chefs are the stars,  TV from all over the world are full of cooking shows, publishing industry produces it’s best-sellers. Now, food typical products are cool- defended by the Slow Food Presidia project –  they are a status symbol.

A winning idea – Slow Food – as sometimes happens, is not the result of the predictable.

Slow Food Story is the story of a group of friends from a province growing  together between jokes, colossal eating and political passion. Between them, there is Petrini, of course. But there are also his best friends: Azio Citi and Giovanni Ravinale.

This is the story of their friendship. A story made of joy, but also of sorrows.

A story of restaurants, story of revived farmers rituals (like the “sing the eggs” ritual at night, during Lent in the farms of Langhe, waking up the farmers with improvised musicians and red wine, till dawn). A story of unmissable events like the club Tenco and the beast of San Fermin in Pamplona. A story of drunken travels, of bets, won or lost, but lived always with the same unsinkable gruff and contagious humor and character.

A life rich and unique. That is the life of Carlìn. Today he is an “European hero”, says Time Magazine, and a columnist in the most important Italian newspaper. Petrini is firmly anchored in the small town from which he took off, in spite of the global dimension of the international movement that he founded.

Here is a story that shows us how even the most important cultural adventures can arise from an amused and ironic approach to life.

And that, perhaps, deserves to be told.

Gotham Greens + Whole Foods: Commercial-Scale City Greenhousing

57904_10151356204230843_895285916_nGotham Greens is the first commercial-scale rooftop hydroponic greenhouse in the world. They got together with Whole Foods for this groundbreaking entrepreneurship, using less water, eliminating pesticides, putting an end to fertilizer runoff and leading the way to a sustainable agriculture.

 

 

 

You can read more on this Whole Foods article.

Seymour Powell creates new Hozelock gardening products

Good news for those who grow their vegetables at home are getting more frequent. This practice is growing big as a life style, relevant products are also getting better. Here is a post, about this well done project by Seymour Powell for the garden brand Hozelock, I found on Design Week.

“Seymour Powell has created the new Growbag Waterer and Flexi Spray for garden brand Hozelock.”

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The new products form part of Hozelock’s drive to ‘to minimise consumer hassle through new and innovative products that would grow the business’, according to Seymour Powell.

The new Growbag Waterer automatically irrigates plants for up to a fortnight, using a capillary action. It uses a large trough with watering spikes that push a capillary mat into the growbag, aiming to minimise water waste and improve efficiency by absorbing the water upwards as opposed to watering down.

The Flexi Spray adaptable hose attachment works as a sprinkler, a long reach hose for hanging baskets and a hands free hose, with a ‘strong spray function for cleaning’, according to Seymour Powell.

The product uses patented twist action engineering, and the consultancy says it can ‘withstand at least 2000 different orientations and twists on every single millimetre point without breaking.’

The consultancy initially reviewed the Hozelock offer to identity different gardening ‘attitudes’, including Devoted, Systematic, Romantic and Averse.

Seymour Powell then looked at how irrigation fitted into the lives of each of these gardening ‘types’ to develop a range of products, which it says are also influenced by the brand’s Gardening for Life focus.

More products design by Seymour Powell for Hozelock are in the pipeline.

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FoodMood

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FoodMood is an interactive information visualization project about food and emotion – two basic yet complex components of everyday life. The project aims do gain a better understanding of global food consumption patterns and its impact on the daily emotional well-being of people against the backdrop of countries’ GDP and obesity levels.

Friday Project – Graphic Furniture & Food Storage

11878_4745865163248_727720248_nThis year I had the opportunity to get involved with the Milan Design Week events and I’d like to share some projects with you, our few blog readers! Considering when the events happened, I’m late, I know. But my scuse is that good information never gets old!

I met the people from Friday Project in the Salone Satelite. We couldn’t talk much there because it was pretty crowded, but they sent me some material later. Here it is.

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Time ago we use to give food a proper space. Then with the modern
kitchen, we started to place everything together, organizing pasta and
bread in the middle of plates and pots, and stacking the rest in the
refrigerator.
This furniture gives again a proper space to the food and organize it with
an educational purpose. It is based on the principles of the food guide
pyramid: it gives more space to what we should eat more, and less to
other products.

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The structure is made on painted steel with a mosaic of materials that
correspond to different functions: wooden drawers for bread, pasta and
cereals, dark spaces for potatoes and onions, a terracotta box for fresh
vegetables, shelves with spaces for eggs, aromatic herbs, spices…
The open structure and the palette of materials, are a way to show and
communicate what we have at home, suggesting combination and
inspiring recipes. All the products are displayed with a specific sequence
and logic, in order to understand immediately how much space we should
give to cereals and vegetables instead of cookies and sweets.
It’s a way to bring in the house an educational system for our diet. It’s an
instrument to show the food we have at home, and to push people to
combine it in an healthy way.

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The aim of this furniture is also combining in one object different
techniques of food preservation. It follows the theories, that many
designers are applying in interesting solutions, of conserving food out of
the refrigerator. There is for example a terracotta box, designed to keep
the “living food” fresh by using natural processes. It consist in a traditional
system, called Zeer or “pot in pot”: by keeping wet the sand layer
between the two pots, we activate an evaporative process that takes out
the warmth and maintains the vegetables fresh.

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The object has a strong concept, but is also a way of thinking the kitchen,
not as a strong block, but organized by functions. The lines of the furniture
are simple and essential, the shape is geometric and emphatic. The
purpose of using different materials it’s a way to communicate the variety
of functions and the colours of the furniture are emphasize by the
products we will display on it.
It is part of a collection of objects, named “graphic furnitures”, that we are
going to present for the first time at Salone Satellite.
There’s a lamp named “Flamingo” with a long, thin stick. It’s graphical
lines are simple and elegant. There’s nothing hidden in the construction, it
brings to life the spontaneous and colorful intention of a child drawing.
The top part has a laser cut pattern to reflect the light in the space in a
scenographic way. It’s totally realized in painted steel.
And “people”, a set of stools, tables and planters. The shape is simple and
clear, and they have little feet to run away. They are made of painted steel
and a removable wood panel.
FridayProject’s furnitures are designed with a graphical approach,
characterized by straight lines, playful shapes and pastel colours.

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Michael Pollan’s Food Rules

Based on Michael Pollan’s talk “Food Rules” given at the RSA, this animation was created in the context of the RSA/Nominet Trust film competition. Using a mixture of stop-motion and compositing, our aim and challenge was to convey the topic in a visually interesting way using a variety of different food products. We made a little table top set up at home and worked on this a little over three weeks.

More information available at benoitdetalle.com/food-rules

Here are also some photos of Michael Pollan’s Food Rules in the making
flickr.com/photos/horror_vacui/sets/72157629336379435/

 

By 
WebMD Health News

Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

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Also read a post from WebMD, March 23, 2009

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– We Americans suffer a national eating disorder: our unhealthy obsession with healthy eating.

That’s the diagnosis delivered by food author Michael Pollan in a lecture given last week to an overflow crowd of CDC scientists.

As part of an effort to bring new ideas to the national debate on food issues, the CDC invited Pollan — a harsh critic of U.S. food policies — to address CDC researchers and to meet with leaders of the federal agency.

“The French paradox is that they have better heart health than we do despite being a cheese-eating, wine-swilling, fois-gras-gobbling people,” Pollan said. “The American paradox is we are a people who worry unreasonably about dietary health yet have the worst diet in the world.”

In various parts of the world, Pollan noted, necessity has forced human beings to adapt to all kinds of diets.

“The Masai subsist on cattle blood and meat and milk and little else. Native Americans subsist on beans and maize. And the Inuit in Greenland subsist on whale blubber and a little bit of lichen,” he said. “The irony is, the one diet we have invented for ourselves — the Western diet — is the one that makes us sick.”

Snowballing rates of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease in the U.S. can be traced to our unhealthy diet. So how do we change?

7 Words & 7 Rules for Eating

Pollan says everything he’s learned about food and health can be summed up in seven words: “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.”

Probably the first two words are most important. “Eat food” means to eat real food — vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and, yes, fish and meat — and to avoid what Pollan calls “edible food-like substances.”

Here’s how:

  1. Don’t eat anything your great grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food. “When you pick up that box of portable yogurt tubes, or eat something with 15 ingredients you can’t pronounce, ask yourself, “What are those things doing there?” Pollan says.
  2. Don’t eat anything with more than five ingredients, or ingredients you can’t pronounce.
  3. Stay out of the middle of the supermarket; shop on the perimeter of the store. Real food tends to be on the outer edge of the store near the loading docks, where it can be replaced with fresh foods when it goes bad.
  4.  Don’t eat anything that won’t eventually rot. “There are exceptions — honey — but as a rule, things like Twinkies that never go bad aren’t food,” Pollan says.
  5. It is not just what you eat but how you eat. “Always leave the table a little hungry,” Pollan says. “Many cultures have rules that you stop eating before you are full. In Japan, they say eat until you are four-fifths full. Islamic culture has a similar rule, and in German culture they say, ‘Tie off the sack before it’s full.'”
  6. Families traditionally ate together, around a table and not a TV, at regular meal times. It’s a good tradition. Enjoy meals with the people you love. “Remember when eating between meals felt wrong?” Pollan asks.
  7. Don’t buy food where you buy your gasoline. In the U.S., 20% of food is eaten in the car.